Culture & Heritage

Thrissur has a rich historical and cultural heritage as it has been influenced and enriched by both Indian sources as well as European and Arab sources during medieval and colonial times. Puli Kali also known as Kaduvakali is the body painting art form which is practised here and often showcased during festivals such as Onam. Another cultural hub of Thrissur is the Indian coffee house which was established in 1958. There are many renowned Art colleges in Thrissur such as the Kerala Sangeetha Nataka Academy as well the Kerala Sahitya Academy. This city also hosts its own film festival which is the Thrissur International Film Festival among many other cultural events throughout the year. One of the biggest annual attractions in Thrissur is the Thrissur Pooram where decorated elephants march through the city to the Vadakkunnathan Temple.

Thrissur Pooram

Thrissur Pooram is an annual Hindu temple festival held in Kerala, India. It is held at the Vadakkunnathan Temple in Thrissur every year on the Pooram day – the day when the moon rises with the Pooram star in the Malayalam Calendar month of Medam. It is the largest and most famous of all poorams

 

 

 

Puli Kali

Pulikkali is a recreational folk art from the state of Kerala.It is performed by trained artists to entertain people on the occasion of Onam.The folk art is mainly practiced in Thrissur district of Kerala.The festival attracts thousands of people to the Thrissur city. Pulikkali is also performed during various other festive seasons.

Buon Natale

Buon Natale, the colourful Christmas procession, organised by the Thrissur Archdiocese in association with the Thrissur Pouravali.Buon Natale procession entered the Guinness World Records in 2014 for having the maximum number of Santas.

Kodungallur Bharani

The annual festival at the Sree Kurumba Bhagavathy Temple situated at Kodungalloor is famous across Kerala and is known as the Kodungalloor Bharani. It takes place during the Malayalam month of Meenam. A sea of red overruns the premises as a flurry of oracles (velichappad) dancing in a trance offer their prayers to the deity.